Writing Techniques – Getting More Out Of Your Time

So, in my stumblings and flailings about the internet, I’ve run across a blog post that I feel like sharing.  Mostly, this is for my benefit; it’s a technique that I want to try when I sit down to start writing large chunks of fiction again, as opposed to this fine-grained editing mire I currently find myself in.

It’s a guest post by Rachel Aaron, and it talks about how she increased her writerly output to 10,000 words per day without spending more time writing.  It’s that last part that’s interesting to me, as I only have so much time in a day.  I’m looking for efficiency, not just needing to have my butt in a chair writing for six hours a day (a mathematical improbability).

What seems to be the hook for me is scribbling down that to-do list of a summary of the next however many words.  I’m not a plotter, and I’m rarely even a planner – at least not far in advance.  However, I do know how my current scene will go when I start it, and I have vague ideas about the next (and so skip scene to scene seeing only a little bit ahead of me).  That technique seems like one that would work well for me.

The feedback on when you write the best is also a good idea, backed up with data.  We (humans) are really, really bad at heuristic measurements a lot of times – we overemphasize some things that are not as important, and we ignore other things that are (and then oftentimes rationalize those choices in light of data, which is a rant for another time).  Collecting hard data on productivity is a plus, even if my writing schedule isn’t the most flexible.

So this is something that I’ll probably try out in the spring.  I’m not sure how much good it will do, not yet, but I want to keep it in mind, and have an easy link back to the post.

And on that note, are there any other blog posts or pieces of advice that you have on getting more out of your writing time?

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1 Response to Writing Techniques – Getting More Out Of Your Time

  1. racquelin says:

    This is like… Overachieving 101. And exactly how I write, with the list of what I want and the details already in mind. My notebooks are full of these lists. And it’s why NaNo is a pain in the ass, because my prime writing hours are after midnight… kind of hard with a midnight deadline and work the next morning.

    So yes, it works. 😛

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